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  • Rita Hitching

#TeenBrainHackMoods Emotion neurons still developing

Everyone has moods and feelings that fluctuate, but some teenagers feel these mood swings more than others.  Emotional development and the ability to manage emotions is a life long journey.  Be kind to yourself if you feel like your emotions are a little overwhelming.  The neurons located in the brain region associated with emotional development grow during adolescence.  Like anything that is starting out, at times were are growing pains.  The mood and emotional experiences of all teenagers are just part of the incredible brain changes your body is going through.


Teenage mood swings part of normal brain development

The amygdala - or more precisely the amygdalae - you have two almond shaped structures located in each right and left temporal lobe is key in the development of emotional intelligence. The majority of the brain has done its growing by childhood and adolescence, but not the amygdala - the fastest growth period is in your late teens. The late development of this brain region is thought to explain why moods and emotions are so focal to teens and young adults.


Tips to manage emotions:

1: Understand that emotions are part of being human, be kind to yourself..

2: Talk about your worries and stresses with someone you trust.

3: Find ways to relieve stress - exercise is the single best way - sweat it out.




Read the original research: Immature excitatory neurons develop during adolescence in the human amygdala. Shawn F. Sorrells, Mercedes F. Paredes, Dmitry Velmeshev, Vicente Herranz-Pérez, Kadellyn Sandoval, Simone Mayer, Edward F. Chang, Ricardo Insausti, Arnold R. Kriegstein, John L. Rubenstein, Jose Manuel Garcia-Verdugo, Eric J. Huang & Arturo Alvarez-Buylla. Nature Communications, Volume 10, Article number: 2748 (2019)